• Fight against cardiovascular disease and its consequences, especially in women and children

  • Valuing research in the field of cardiovascular disease

  • Let us help the care of the most deprived heart patients

  • Eradicating Cardiovascular Diseases that Cause Mortality in Sub-Saharan Africa

  • Fight against cardiovascular disease and its consequences, especially in women and children

  • Valuing research in the field of cardiovascular disease

  • Let us help the care of the most deprived heart patients

  • Eradicating Cardiovascular Diseases that Causes Mortality in Sub-Saharan Africa

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
  • 6
  • 7
  • 8

Cardiovascular diseases first cause of death

                                 Cardiovascular illnesses
6
WHO has studied the causes of death and disabling diseases worldwide. Chronic noncommunicable diseases, with cardiovascular diseases in the forefront, are the leading cause of global mortality. Among these noncommunicable diseases, cardiovascular diseases are the Responsible for mortality.

This mortality is particularly severe in West Africa, as can be seen from the following map from WHO.

According to the WHO,

"There are an estimated 17.3 million deaths from cardiovascular disease, accounting for 30% of total global mortality. Among these deaths, an estimated 7.3 million are due to coronary heart disease and 6.2 million To a stroke (statistics 2008).

More than 80% of deaths occur in middle- and low-income countries and affect almost equally men and women.

By 2030, nearly 23.3 million people will die from cardiovascular disease (mainly heart disease or stroke). These diseases are projected to remain the leading causes of death.

Most cardiovascular diseases can be prevented by addressing risk factors such as smoking, poor nutrition and obesity, lack of physical activity, high blood pressure, diabetes, Hyperlipidemia.

9.4 million deaths each year, or 16.5% of all deaths, can be attributed to high blood pressure.This is responsible for 51% of deaths due to stroke and 45% of deaths Due to coronary heart disease.

West Africa is particularly affected by these cardiovascular diseases, as can be seen on the WHO maps for each country in this subregion, showing cardiovascular mortality and the importance of different cardiovascular diseases. Cardiovascular risk factors.

The severity and frequency of cardiovascular disease in West Africa require prevention and treatment. Prevention is done by controlling cardiovascular risk factors:

Treatment is by specialized assessment, follow-up, appropriate medical treatment and, if necessary, cardiac or vascular surgery or by catheterization. The latter require high technicality in cardiac surgery centers and interventional catheterization.

Absence of surgical center specialized in cardiac surgery in West Africa.
A study by the International Cooperation in World Cardiology of 1999 (6) shows the disparity in the availability of cardiac surgery centers in different parts of the world:

  • 1 center for 120,000 inhabitants in the USA
  • 1 center per 1 000 000 inhabitants in Europe
  • 1 center for 16,000,000 inhabitants in Asia
  • 1 center for 50,000,000 inhabitants in Africa

In industrialized countries WHO estimates that a pediatric cardiac surgery center, which performs 300 to 500 surgeries per year, is needed for 2 million people.
Needs in developing countries are not objectively estimated but are likely to be higher due to the high proportion of children in their populations and the higher incidence of severe heart disease in children in these countries.
There are currently no specific surgical centers in West Africa.

These facts are the motivation of our project: to bring expertise in the management and prevention of cardiovascular pathologies to transfer these skills to local actors.

Newsletter

Register for the latest news, every weekend in your mailbox.

Make a donation

Enter Amount